Proof of Financial Support and Affidavit of Support – Form I-134

During the visa interview, applicants will be required to present evidence that they will not become a public charge in the United States.  You may present evidence that you are able to financially support yourself or that your U.S. citizen fiancé(e) is able to provide support.  The Consular Officer may request that a Form I-134, Affidavit of Support, be submitted by the U.S. citizen fiancé(e).

Affidavit of Support

Persons in the U.S. who wish to furnish sponsorship in the form of an affidavit of support for a fiancé(e) visa applicant or for an immigrant visa applicant who is not required to have the I-864, should use Form I-134 which is available from the USCIS website.

To substantiate the information regarding income and resources the sponsor should attached two or more of the following items to the affidavit:

  • Copies of his or her latest federal income tax return
  • Statement from his/her employer showing salary and the length and permanency of employment
  • Statement from an officer of a bank regarding his/her account, the date the account was opened and the present balance
  • Any other evidence adequate to establish financial ability to carry out his/her undertaking toward the applicant for what might be an indefinite period of time

Affidavits of support should be of recent date when presented to the consular officer. They are unacceptable if more than one year has elapsed from the date of execution. The affidavit of support should be given to the applicant to present on the day of his/her visa interview. If you do not wish the person to see this affidavit, it may be sent directly to the Embassy/Consulate with a cover letter giving the applicant’s full name, date and place of birth and case number.

Employment

An applicant relying on an offer of prearranged employment to meet the public charge provisions of the law should have the prospective employer submit a notarized letter of employment on letterhead stationary of the employing business. The letter should:

  • Contain a definite offer of employment
  • Give a description of the job offered to the alien and an explanation of skills which qualify the alien for the position
  • State the rate of compensation to be paid and if pertinent, additional information detailing other benefits to be included in lieu of cash payment
  • Specify the location, type and duration (whether seasonal, temporary or indefinite) of the employment offered and
  • State whether the employment will be immediately available upon the applicant’s arrival in the United States.

Applicant’s Own Funds

An applicant who expects to be able to meet the public charge provisions of the law through personal financial resources may submit to the consular officer evidence of funds or income from one or more of the following sources:

  • Bank statement showing present balance of applicant’s account, date account was opened, number and amount of deposits and withdrawals during the past 12 months, and the average balance during the year. If there have been unusually large recent deposits, an explanation thereof should be given
  • Proof of ownership of property or real estate, in the form of a title deed or the equivalent and a letter from a lawyer, or real estate agent showing its present valuation (any mortgages or loans against the property must be stated)
  • Letter or letters verifying ownership of stocks and bonds, with present market value or indication of expected earnings
  • Statement from insurance company showing policies held and present case surrender value
  • Proof of income from business investments or other sources

If the financial resources are derived from a source outside the United States, a statement as to how the funds or income are to be transferred to the United States. must be provided.